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doon_design

DOON: Pattern Designers Par Excellence

by Susi, 27 September 2008

Studio Doon does patterns for industry.

Here is a business named after a boxer pup, that does nothing but create patterns for industry. Any industry. Digitally. Customisably.  (Is that a word?). DOON. The website is a dream, there are even pithy quotes about design and appearance to ponder while the images load. DOON. Come. Sit. Stay.

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      • September 28, 2008

      SJ -- Normally I'm not roving around one site, or blog, commenting, but today, Saturday, Decatur Island -- north of Seattle some 80 miles, a couple of notes are okay. Doon is an interesting modeling. What I find, in exploring that idea -- the patterning -- is that it represents a kind of psychic intimacy. A pattern reflects the reach of the mind. There is memory hidden there. Patterning is a kind of insinuation of some mysterious mnemonic -- a patterning of mind fullness -- and a reach into the heart of meaning and emotion. For me, in designing, that idea of pattern making is at once about telling the story of a proposition, and yet, it's another -- a kind of mythic gesture. In scribing a repetitive ranging of layer on layer, one practices a legendary marking -- creating markings that are distinct with meaning. For in one layer, there is beauty, in another, there is something with deeper symbolic value and character. One story on the surface, another is found -- deeper down. One experience is about light, color, beauty in expression -- another reaches to content, context, power and the magic of illustration and the lustrous. That which shines, illumes through. There are patterns that you recognize in a deep way, they reach and connect with your heart, there is a recalling to memory, they gather some sense of the architecture of emotion and experience -- what makes that happen is unknown, of course. Working with retail design and brand strategy guru, Dawn Clark, AIA LEED AP, I learned more about how this idea of implementation of story in place -- and the making of it -- can be powerfully implemented. Surely there's something there, to the deep complexities and symbolic imagery of tribal art and pattern making. But there's some way of gathering that sense of legend, in pattern, and bringing into other experiences. Some ideas, to applications, here: Seibu | Jakarta, the work, the patterning, the space: http://www.girvin.com/portfolio/environment/seibu/seibu.php Seibu | Jakarta: patterning blog --http://blog.girvin.com/?p=549 To the conceptions of patterning in architectural applications broadly explored, there are some commentaries here: Modernism | Decoration and patterning in placemaking -- http://blog.girvin.com/?p=967 Patterning, seen in other light -- to nature: Patterning in pattern: the cairn, the stone, the array: http://tim.girvin.com/Entries/?p=454 Pattern is rhythm. Rhythm is life. Design is a heartbeat on the note of that pulse. Patterning explicates. Tim Girvin | http://www.girvin.com | http://www.tim.girvin.com/ | http://blog.girvin.com/ | http://tim.girvin.com/Entries/index.php | girvin@girvin.com

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      • September 28, 2008

      Tim, you say exactly what I was thinking when I posted about Doon. The patterns evoke something very tangible, without representing anything identifiable. The state of mind and spirit during this experience is open, deeply felt, but non-referential. It does not get tangled in the nets of specific thoughts or experience or words. It is a meditative state. Even more open than cloud-watching. While cloud-watching we see "rabbits" and "dragons" and "faces". Most of Doon's patterns seem to be carefully designed to bring us beyond the cloud-watching phenomenon. The best of them make me experience the feeling of "remembering". Not remembering "something". Simply experiencing the feeling of remembering itself, without an object. I spent years delving into the study of formal aesthetics, Kant, Schiller, Goethe, modern continental philosophers, the ancients, too. Being in state where one is "aware" rather than "aware of" touches the essence of the aesthetic experience that so many philosophical writings have struggled to fathom and define.

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